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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
evacuations in the low-lying areas of queens and brooklyn. he ordered that in hurricane irene and thankfully, there were no problems at that time. but officials taking this very seriously, potentially flooding in brooklyn and queens on the atlantic ocean and new york bay, as hurricane sandy bears down on the northeast. we will have continuing live coverage, throughout the hour. >> the fox extreme weather alert for you, the national hurricane center issuing the latest advisory on hurricane sandy, set to strike in the north evert. a rare super storm. the hurricane lashing north carolina with pounding winds and rain. massive waves are crashing ark shore on the outer banks. people in connecticut are bracing for the worst with the governor declaring a state of emergency there. let's return to our chief meteorologist. you know, rick, we heard mayor michael bloomberg ordering mandatory evacuations for low-lying areas in brooklyn and queens. you are talking about hundreds and thousands of people and shutting down the subway and buses. >> this happened last year in hurricane irene and it wasn't that
you can see the trees. hurricane irene they lost enough trees. $22,000 worth of trees fell down. this storm expected to be much tougher, more devastating than hurricane irene. look at this. that's a scaffold around an art project. new york city is full of scaffolding like that. things that we are watching today. want to head it over now to "cnn newsroom." newsroom." they're up next. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good morning to you. i sure hope you're keeping dry somewhere. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for being with us. we begin this morning with hurricane sandy, within hours expected to explode into this superstorm. most of us have never season anything like it in our lifetime. already huge, tropical storm force winds spanning a width of nearly 1,000 mimes. it's aiming at the heart of the east coast, the most heavily populated corridor in the country. 50 million people are expected to feel the effects. hundreds of thousands are now under evacuation orders. fema predicts damage costs of about $3 billion just for wind damage alone. heavy rains or snow, storm
the winners, so to speak, and the losers because it is asymmetric, right? >>> now last year hurricane irene's initial projections were $7 billion. turned out to be $15 billion. there were a lot of ancillaries once the checks come out from the government and private insurers. stimulus to the gdp. not big enough to move the needle. this one we're getting initial projections is much bigger. the two cohorts in stocks most impacted the home depot-like places, let's call them that, they were basically moved up a day ahead of the storm and then pulled off once the market turned out to be. >> we didn't see much of that on friday in terms of home depot or at lowe's which i thought was interesting and most of the retailers have closed their books on saturday, last saturday, so the impact of the storm won't actually be seen until the following quarter or the next month when they report retail sales. lowe's is the exception. they closed books on saturday. all the runup, the generators they've sold, the batteries, the flashlights, those things were almost sold out pretty much across the board. that shou
're all so unique. i try to focus on the consequences. for the northeast, i think after last year's irene, we pretty well reminded everybody northeast has a hurricane threat. >> all right. >> they would like to reopen trading by wednesday of this week at the latest. >> do many insurance companies cover this type of sdmer. >> many don't. they don't include flood insurance, water damage. many homeowners if they look at their policies will recognize that hurricanes in many cases aren't covered. they would have to buy insurance through the government insurance for flooding and many haven't done that. we might find out there are plenty of people after this that don't have the coverage they would need. >> thank you. >>> the presidential campaigns have canceled more than a dozen events because of sandy. president obama called off appearances today in florida, ohio, and virginia. and another one tomorrow in wisconsin so he can monitor storm developments. we have more from the obama campaign from orlando. >> reporter: good morning, charlie, nornora, and viewers in the west.
nervous. >> you think it's going to be bad? >> i think so. >> i'm worried. we lucked out with irene, and i don't know. this may be worse. >> nbc's tom strong traung is l rehoboth beach, delaware. any residents left? >> they have about eight hours, the governor issues a mandatory evacuation area. everybody must be out by 8:00. look down the beach, have you several dozen people trying to get their last glimpse. right now, low tide. looks pretty impressive. come high tide, around 6:30, it wouldn't be a surprise if we didn't see water coming up to this fence here. all around rehoboth beach, a lot of businesses boarded up. people making runs to the grocery store, water short, bread is short. people did what they could in terms of preparation. they had about eight hours, around that time, this area will be shut down. cut off the bridges and roads into here it won't be a very pleasant place to stay if the electricity is going to go out. which is a likelihood. 2,000 utility workers and we're talking about the maryland/dc area, baltimore areas, and states of emergencies in those areas as well. a lo
surge right now, that's just the water rise alone with this, 6.6 feet. that's 2.2 feet higher than irene. we're awaiting that high tide coming up. for example, irene was about right here, all right, and what we could see with another two and a half feet is up through here. >> no campaigning for the president. he is locked down at the white house, telephoning governors and mayors and meeting with fema. >> mitt romney is not campaigning but holding what his campaign calls a hurricane relief event coincidentally in battleground ohio. >> we have a lot of goods here and i know there's more coming in and we're going to box these things up in just a minute and put them on some trucks and then we're going to send them into i think it's new jersey. >> new yorkers ordered off the streets last night it was a lonely late night for letterman and fallon. no live audiences to laugh at their jokes. >> got up this morning, turned on the radio and listened for the talk show closings. i have no luck. >> talk show closings. >> yeah. >> that's a play on -- >> wait a minute. i think i hear people banging at t
on the boardwalk. many people have heeded the warnings. they are remembering what happened with irene last year. other people are saying, you know, we have been through the storms before. we are hunkering down and we are not leaking. of course, our fingers are crossed for them. connell: along the shoreline, for better or worse with a large group of people. dagen: breaking news on the water moving into new york city and manhattan our sister station is reporting that parts of fdr drive, this is one of the two main arteries in and out of new york city that runs along the edge of manhattan. on the east side of manhattan is fdr drive, that is now underwater according to fox five. fdr drive is on the east side of manhattan. this is a critical artery of moving traffic in and out of new york city. at 2:00 p.m. eastern time, both the holland and brooklyn battery tunnel will be closing. if people are not in the city or out of the city in a matter of hours, you will not have a choice. you will have to stay right where you are. dagen: if you went up the right side of the horseshoe there, the east river is
storms in 1878 and 1903 and then hurricane irene became a tropical storm when it hit just last year. now, hurricane irene caused roughly $15 billion in damage all across the northeast. the state of new jersey alone got $275 million in federal assistance most going to homeowners and flooding private insurers. here in cape may, commercial fishing is the big business. a billion dollars in revenue for new jersey. further up atlantic city of course we know all of those casinos, 12 flagship institutions across the boardwalk are closed and halloween parties canceled. atlantic city is lower lying. that will be a very, very big hit. the place to watch. evacuated yesterday by 4:00 p.m. and chris christie declaring a state of emergency there because of how bad conditions are supposed to get there. it's only 9:00 a.m. right now. you can see how bad it's getting. the waves are spilling up into the dunes and there is flooding in the street. there's structural damage just a couple blocks away that we'll check out. definitely a strengthening storm here on the shore of new jersey. carl? >> kayla, thank y
. >> that is true. what happened is we had a combination of hurricane irene and hurricane lee. that happened in 1955 with tremendous amounts of water build up. but in this case, it is the storm surge that did the dirty work because the way turned into the coast. again, i want to stress to people that heat and drought and hurricanes along the eastern seaboard are something we will have to deal with for the next several years because of the overall pattern. cooling pacific very warm and women. then we will be back to where we were in the 60s and 70s again. dagen: left hook of the storm, the ride home untransformed hitting us in new york city. if anything, on the jersey shore, that is different than hurricane irene when we saw it. >> that is exactly right. the hurricane is pushing a hand of water up through. in the 1938 hurricane, it doesn't bring a whole heck of a lot. from the storm passed to the left, it does. 15 feet of water in providence, rhode island. imagine that. 3800 of an inch of rain. less than connecticut, all through the delaware valley, tremendous flooding going on there. the same type o
of that was west of the coast, at least where i was we didn't get the rain we got with irene, not even close. >> right, we were most concerned about the flooding because of the tidal action. right there, yeah, the surge, we have wonderful beaches and between dewey beach and bethany beach we had to close route 1. there are a lot of others we had to close throughout the state. the bay communities were hit hard but we've got people out looking right now. we think we escaped the worst of it. >> and total cost for delaware, any idea yet in. >> we don't know. we have people as we say looking right now, i think it will take us a little while to figure that out. certainly concerned about the 44,000 families without power but we're obviously looking forward to utility crews getting out there as soon as, once conditions permit them to be out there. they can't be in harm's way if the winds are too high. >> for your state was this not as significant or not as negative of an outcome as irene, governor? >> well, i mean i'd put it this way we have a lot of flooding and we do have 40,000 plus people without
damage has been minimal compared to what we went through last year when hurricane irene and tropical storm lee came through in the billions. we have to get an assessment. we're getting out of the roadways now. the eastern part of the state. we don't have any aircraft up at this point. we will do that tomorrow. major roads seem to be fine, even secondary roads seem to be fine. the assessment to the end of the week. melissa: how financially prepared are you to make those repairs? will you call for federal aid? >> we receive federal aid in the preplanning process and we hope we are not going to be anywhere near the problems new jersey faced watching the television. preplanning with the money use, we will reimburse for that. ashley: for those people affected by this storm or in the wake of that what advice are you giving them? >> for those in central pennsylvania, the same advice, be careful going outside, stay off the roads, remind them to watch the creeks in low-lying areas because creeks come up quickly, and flooding affects them briefly. melissa: thank you for joining us. the new yor
. at the peak of irene. we're dealing with a history making storm. let's take a look at the center. we expect the center to make its way on shore in the next hour or so. so landfall perhaps within the hour. bring you the latest. there is the latest track again. moving west/northwest at 28 miles per hour. again, we think south jersey, around cape may, but we are getting reports that atlantic city is under water. wind gusts again, as we head throughout the evening. wind gusts in excess of 100 miles per hour. hurricane force winds extending 120 miles away from the center of the storm. we're going to feel this up and down the coastline, the worst of storm surge, wind and rain north of where the center makes landfall. kimberly? >> kimberly: thank you. we'll check back with you later in the program. it may hit landfall in this program. let's go to rick leventhal, live in point pleasant, new jersey, where we have seen the conditions deteriorating by the hour. rick? >> we moved off the beach. it was too nasty out there. we moved to the hotel one block from the beach. where the power is now coming on
know, put katrina at one end. that was $100 billion. put irene at another end. that was a $13 billion event. i've seen 30 to 50. it feels, especially after you see that aerial video of what happens on the shores of new jersey, like it may be more along the 30 to 50 range when you talk about total property damage and you talk also about lost business activity. it was down in wall street. >> especially at a time when the economy was -- there was a sense it was starting to slow down again. we haven't had the strongest economy anyway. are we more vulnerable to this? >> i don't want to say there's an up side to this, but you could have a situation where some of the construction and some of the rebuilding happens in the same quarter where you had the business loss, so you have a really net no change to gdp. if there are major construction projects undertaken -- for example, let's say they decide the biggest financial center in the world should not be a foot over sea level, that's a major investment that could have a positive back on gdp. >> that's a great point, steve. as far as the idea th
this. we got banged up very badly a year ago with irene. much worse than other states. six weeks later, we had a winter storm that wiped us out. we had 1.1 customers without power in our state. tonight we have over 600,000 people without power. some of our towns were affected by all three of those events and some towns had 97% people without power each and every time in the last year. we're getting used to this right now. we're actually becoming experts at it. >> in terms of the frequency of extreme weather, we have seen governor cuomo talking about that as the new normal. climate change is such a politicized things, but if we're seeing frequent instances of things that are not supposed to happen but once in a century, what do you have to do differently in terms of infrastructure you wouldn't have to do if you weren't facing these events? >> number one, i have been talking about climate change since 1997. it's happened. it's alive and well in connecticut. number two, we have to raise a lot of infrastructure. literally lift it up off the ground. and we have to think of our cities very d
've been through this. we got banged up very badly a year ago with irene much worse than other states. six weeks later we had a winter storm that wiped us out. we had 1.1 million people in our little -- our customers in our little state without power. tonight we have over 600,000 people without power. some of our towns were affected by all three of those events and some of those towns are 97% of people without power. we're getting used to it and becoming experts at it. >> in terms of the frequency of extreme we've seen governor cuomo talking about it as planning on it to be the new normal. climate change is so politicized but if we are seeing frequent things of things that aren't supposed to happen what are you to do differently that you wouldn't have to do if you weren't facing these frequent and continuing events. >> i've been talking about climbed change since 1997. it's happened. it's alive and well in connecticut. number two, we have to raise a lot of infrastructure, that is literally lift it up off the ground and we have to think of our cities very differently than we thought about t
's warmest year since recordkeeping began in 1895. and it's just over a year ago that hurricane irene caused record flooding in the northeast. but with sandy came new records and according to new york governor andrew cuomo, more pressure for governments to act. >> i joke that every two years we have a 100 year flood. the frequency is way up. it is not prudent, to sit here, i believe, at this point and say, well it's not going to happen again. once you have that recognition, then what are you doing about it. and what design changes, what construction changes are you making to deal with it. >> suarez: as new york struggles to recover from sandy, cuomo looked to the long-term, calling for a "fundamental rethinking of our built environment." one key issue: how to protect the new york subway system which experienced the worst damage in it's 108 year history. many stations remain submerged under several feet of water even as limited operations are expected to resume tomorrow. but infrastructure renovations are not always a clear fix. mayor michael bloomberg, who has taken a number of steps to make
irene, goes by, the wind goes to the west even though it's strong to the west. it blows everything out. in this particular case, the wind keeps coming in from the southeast. >> yeah. all right. so the next thing i want to ask in terms of what -- for the people that didn't leave and heed the warning of governor cuomo in new york, governor kristchris kristi in new jersey, there a chance their homes could be below water. >> yeah. they could be below water for quite a while. what will happen is the tide tries to go out, and the wind will keep trying to stop the tietide from going out. it's a y dangerous situation. one of the things i got real upset with and i talked to you yesterday for quite a while about the whole situation is not putting the hurricane warning in effect because people think oh, it's a big nor'easter coming. big deal. we've gone through big nor'easters before. when the hurricane warning is put in effect because you have a hurricane coming, it's a very different story. my suggestion is once you've named that storm, you leave the name and the class fakings is important. >>
. >> it is handed down through generations to generations. and what happened here really was when irene came last time, everybody left and a lot of people have houses, they got devastated. i think people felt this time, just wait here and see what happens. whether you're here or not, this is tremendous. to rebuild this will be a mammoth -- i don't know how they'll go about starting it. this is really tragic. >> reporter: this area, everybody is assessing the damage, but take a look, look at this car, the rubber of the tires completely burned off. the interior reduced to smithere smithereens, people did not move their cars out and as a result, they simply caught fire. homes that are nearby that didn't actually get the full impact of the fire, the siding melted off from the sheer heat. you can see some firefighters here, again, they have been here around the clock, through the night this is a dmcommunity whe you have firefighters, retired police officers, folks from the coast guard, all know each other, all grow up here and they're assessing the damage. the smell is so pungent, anderson, of the fir
in white plains, where literally trees are ripped from its roots. >> amazing stuff. first, irene, now sandy. for two consecutive years, costly deadly hurricanes hit the northeast. we're hear a lot of people say if irene was a wake-up call, sandy is a bucket of water that should snap us all to attention. let's listen to andrew cuomo, the governor of new york. >> there has been a series of extreme weather incidents. anyone that is not a political statement, that is not a factual statement. anyone who says there is not a dramatic change in weather patterns, i think is denying reality. and i would like to say that this is probably the last occurrence we will have. i don't believe that. >> cuomo went on to say new york now seems to get a 100 year flood every two years. joining me now is ben strauss, the chief operating officer and director of the program on sea level rise at climate central. is this a sign of things to come? governor cuomo is saying we seem to be getting 100-year storm every two years. >> this was actually -- since 1900, three of the top ten highest flood levels have occurred in
a mandatory evacuation thinking last year's hurricane irene wasn't so bad. so did many of her neighbors. the owners of this house barely survived. they fled their home at 6:00 monday night. it broke apart soon after. neighborwide david scharf finds himself searching for keepsakes of places where he learned to ride a bike. >> i grew up here basically in my childhood home and it's basically gone. the water ripped through here last night and this morning and it's utter devastation. >> reporter: your parents still live here? >> my parents still live here. they are safely in brooklyn, and we're trying to salvage the remnants of what's left of the home. >> reporter: what would you like to find for your parent's sake? >> i'd like to find some photographs, for my children's sake my childhood photographs. i'd like to find some things from my grandparents that my grandparents had here. these are real treasures. hopefully we find them. >> reporter: chief james mcnally says his fire fighters fought hard to save this neighborhood. have you ever seen anything like that before where you simply couldn'
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)